PDA

View Full Version : Của ai...lời này?



anmota
02/28/2008, 09:28 PM
Love Them Anyway
http://www.soaringspiritwithtears.com/graphics/decoration.gif


People are unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered.
Love them anyway.
If you are kind, people may accuse you of selfish ulterior motives.
Be kind anyway.
If you are successful, you will win some false friends and true enemies.
Succeed anyway.
The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow.
Be good anyway.
Honesty and frankness will make you vulnerable.
Be honest and frank anyway.
What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight.
Build anyway.
People need help, but may attack you if you try to help them.
Help them anyway.
In the final analysis, it is between you and God.
It was never between you and them anyway.

http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html)


<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=5 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=middle width="15%" bgColor=#f1f1f1>http://www.quotedb.com/images/clear.gif


http://www.quotedb.com/images/authors/mother_teresa.jpg (http://www.quotedb.com/authors/mother-teresa)

http://www.quotedb.com/images/clear.gif


</TD><FORM name=quote><INPUT type=hidden value="People are unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered. Love them anyway. If you do good, people may accuse you of selfish motives. Do good anyway. If you are successful, you may win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway. The good you do today may be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway. Honesty and transparency make you vulnerable. Be honest and transparent anyway. What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway. People who really want help may attack you if you help them. Help them anyway. Give the world the best you have and you may get hurt. Give the world your best anyway." name=text></FORM><TD vAlign=top width="55%" bgColor=#f1f1f1><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=6 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%">"People are unreasonable, illogical, and self-centered. Love them anyway. If you do good, people may accuse you of selfish motives. Do good anyway. If you are successful, you may win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway. The good you do today may be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway. Honesty and transparency make you vulnerable. Be honest and transparent anyway. What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway. People who really want help may attack you if you help them. Help them anyway. Give the world the best you have and you may get hurt. Give the world your best anyway." - Copy to Clipboard (http://javascript<b></b>: copy_to_clipboard('quote.text');)

-- Mother Teresa


===========================

People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered. Love them anyway.
If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway.
If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway.
The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway.
Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable. Be honest and frank anyway.
The biggest men with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men with the smallest minds. Think big anyway.
People favor underdogs, but follow only top dogs. Fight for a few underdogs anyway.
What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway.
People really need help but may attack you if you do help them. Help people anyway.
Give the world the best you have and you'll get kicked in the teeth. Give the world the best you have anyway.

AMT



</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

anmota
02/28/2008, 10:00 PM
http://www.enotalone.com/amazon/img/x/0425195430.jpg (http://www.enotalone.com/books/0425195430.html)http://www.enotalone.com/article/4991.html

==================================
-- Hãy tìm một chữ Việt thích hợp để dịch chữ Anyway trong...'ngữ cảnh" này...
Trong trang nghiathuc.com VTV dịch là " Mặc!..."...
Có lẽ còn có chữ nào khác hơn chăng?

“There are three answers to every question: Yours, mine, and the right one.”
AMT

anmota
02/28/2008, 10:24 PM
<TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="102%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top width=598 bgColor=#ffffff><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" bgColor=#ffffff border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top>The Origin of The Paradoxical Commandments

The Paradoxical Commandments were written by Kent Keith in 1968, when he was 19, a sophomore at Harvard College. They were part of The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council, his first booklet for high school student leaders. Here is how it all came about.
http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/revolution.gif As a senior at Roosevelt High School in Honolulu, Kent was heavily involved in student government. He was student body president and also president of the Honolulu High School Association. He was excited about the challenges of leadership and good leadership techniques.
Because Hawaii did not have a student council leadership workshop to train student council leaders, Kent founded the Hawaii Student Leadership Institute, which held its first session in the summer of 1966. This was the first leadership workshop for high school student leaders that was founded and run entirely by high school students.
Kent went on to attend Harvard. During his four years as an undergraduate there, he gave more than 150 speeches at high schools, student leadership workshops, and state student council conventions in eight states. These were the turbulent sixties, when student activists were seizing buildings, throwing rocks at police, and shouting down opponents. Kent provided an alternative voice. In his public speaking, Kent encouraged students to care about others, and to work through the system to achieve change. One thing he learned was students didn't know how to work through the system to bring about change. Some of them also tended to give up quickly when they faced difficulties or failures. They needed deeper, longer-lasting reasons to keep trying.

"I saw a lot of idealistic young people go out into the world to do what they thought was right, and good, and true, only to come back a short time later, discouraged, or embittered, because they got negative feedback, or nobody appreciated them, or they failed to get the results they had hoped for." recalls Keith. "I told them that if they were going to change the world, they had to really love people, and if they did, that love would sustain them. I also told them that they couldn't be in it for fame or glory. I said that if they did what was right and good and true, they would find meaning and satisfaction, and that meaning and satisfaction would be enough. If they had the meaning, they didn't need the glory." <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=10 width=186 align=right border=0><TBODY><TR><TD align=middle>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/kent_keith_1969.jpg
Kent M. Keith (spring 1969)
</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>In his sophomore year at Harvard, Kent began writing a booklet for high school student leaders that addressed both the how and the why of leading change. The booklet was titled The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council, and it was published by Harvard Student Agencies in 1968. The Paradoxical Commandments were part of Chapter Two, entitled "Brotherly What?"
"I laid down the Paradoxical Commandments as a challenge," Keith said. "The challenge is to always do what is right and good and true, even if others don't appreciate it. You have to keep striving, no matter what, because if you don't, many of the things that need to be done in our world will never get done."He revised the booklet and a new edition, The Silent Revolution in the Seventies, was published by the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) in 1972. Somewhere around 30,000 copies of the two editions were sold in the late sixties and early seventies. Kent also wrote two other booklets for student councils. The Silent Majority: The Problem of Apathy and the Student Council was published by the NASSP in 1971, and Now You're in the Middle: A Handbook for the Student Council Adviser was published by NASSP in 1972.
Immediately after publication of The Silent Revolution, the Paradoxical Commandments were used by student leaders in speeches and student newspaper articles. Over the past 30 years, they have spread throughout the country and around the world. See Sightings of the Paradoxical Commandments. (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/sightings.html)
<CENTER>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/up.gif (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html#top) </CENTER>
Brotherly What?

The Paradoxical Commandments were written by Kent Keith as part of the second chapter of his booklet, The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council, published by Harvard Student Agencies in 1968. The booklet was written for high school student leaders. Here is the full text of the chapter:
CHAPTER TWO: Brotherly What?
This book makes a pretty big assumption. It assumes that you care. I mean, really. Not just because it's fashionable to appear concerned for those who are "less fortunate." Not because you know that pretending to care is going to earn you the title of Mr. Nice. Not because the redhead in the next row loves charitable people. Not because it's a good way to get attention in the public spotlight. No. Something deep, something sincere and real. Being interested in what others think, how they feel, what's important to them, what they need. Being sensitive to the people around you; and when they need something, wanting to help. You might call it brotherly love, a concern for all, people-consciousness.
A lot of sentimental hocus-pocus? Maybe. Personally, I am convinced that unless you really care for the people you are going to lead, you'll never do anything meaningful - except by accident. People-consciousness is a definite prerequisite for good leadership. If you aren't sensitive to the needs of the people you lead, how will you ever be able to answer those needs? Caring is a practical necessity. If you are going to do right by people, you have to be concerned with their welfare.
I would like to enter a plea, here. People-centered student councils need people-conscious leaders. If you find that you are quite indifferent about what the student council does and whether or not it helps or hurts people, please get out. Resign. Your leadership is apt to do more harm than good: it will exist in a vacuum, or be irrelevant, or even be antagonistic to the needs of your peers. If you don't care, you're not going to help anyone. So unless you have a deep feeling for the welfare of the people you are supposed to lead, please, stop leading.
It is not easy to be people-conscious all the time; it is not easy to keep student council affairs from being self-centered instead of people-centered. After all, our own interests are naturally in the fore, and it is a real effort to keep them subordinated. For example: how willing are you to support a project that you feel has great value but is considered ridiculous by the student council? So often, sensitive members of the council do not speak up because they are afraid of "making fools of themselves" by standing alone on an issue. Which do you place first, your own popularity and prestige, or the meaningfulness attached to helping people? People-consciousness is not easy to come by, and often hard to put into effect. You have to really care, to make it work.
<CENTER>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/up.gif (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html#top) </CENTER>
The idea of really caring for others has an important effect on the other side of the coin: the leader himself. In The Silent Revolution, caring is necessary not only because you must care in order to do relevant and meaningful things; it is also necessary to make your leadership durable. A deep concern for others is one of the few motivations, I'm convinced, that is powerful enough to compensate for the sacrifice - as well as provide the inspiration - for strong and purposeful leadership. Without it, you may be very unhappy and short-lived as a leader.
Essentially, the price tag on the Silent Revolution is that you must give up a lot of ego-satisfaction. As you will see later, you must reconcile yourself to being less noisy, less dramatic, less heroic- and more of a behind-the-scenes mover of events. In the Silent Revolution you must give of your time and effort because you care and want to give, not because you are expecting glory and prominence in return. It is very conceivable, of course, that if you really do something for your student body, they will respect you for it and be glad they elected you. You can be selfless and popular, but popularity must not be your goal. Do things because you believe in them, and the simple satisfaction of having achieved them will be enough. (Applause is great, but it's only the frosting, and we've got to bake cakes.) If you're in it for other people, then helping them will give you satisfaction that having your name in lights could never compete with!
Lack of praise or recognition is often a result of using the Silent Revolution. It is comparatively easy to bear; it is a simple kind of self-denial which allows the achievement of greater meaning and satisfaction. Other situations are less easy. Being attacked and mistreated by the people you are trying to help, for example, is a possibility much harder to stomach than a mere lack of recognition. It hurts in particular when you really care for the people who are attacking you: if you didn't care, you could shrug it off with indifference. And yet, a deep concern for people makes it possible to understand that attack with compassion, and to keep helping. This kind of paradoxical situation can occur often. Indeed, we might list some "Paradoxical Commandments of Leadership:"
People are illogical, unreasonable, and self-centered. Love them anyway.
If you do good, people will accuse you of selfish ulterior motives. Do good anyway.
If you are successful, you win false friends and true enemies. Succeed anyway.
The good you do today will be forgotten tomorrow. Do good anyway.
Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable. Be honest and frank anyway.
The biggest men with the biggest ideas can be shot down by the smallest men with the smallest minds. Think big anyway.
People favor underdogs, but follow only top dogs. Fight for a few underdogs anyway.
What you spend years building may be destroyed overnight. Build anyway.
People really need help but may attack you if you do help them. Help people anyway.
Give the world the best you have and you'll get kicked in the teeth. Give the world the best you have anyway.<CENTER>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/up.gif (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html#top) </CENTER>
You'll find that there is no such thing as going through a Silent Revolution just for fun. It's seldom fun. It's tiring, ridiculously nerve-wracking, demoralizing, and seemingly impossible. You've got to be deeply committed to people - all of them, not just the ones who are nice to you - in order to go through with it. If you're in it for other people, you may not always succeed, but you can be happy in the knowledge that you are doing things which are as meaningful as possible - for both you and the people you're helping. You're working at full potential, so there can be no regrets. You're doing the most you can, as best you can.
One thing can't be overemphasized here: this approach does not require saints, nor does it make martyrs. It requires conscientious leaders, and provides a meaningful leadership style; it requires sensitive leaders, and provides an effective outlet for that sensitivity. Why a saint? Silent Revolutions simply need people who are very human. And why a martyr? Silent Resolutions demand a lot, but they give a lot in return.
Personally, I'm convinced that if you are helping people for your sake and not theirs, you'll never be satisfied: either the "return" in personal glorification won't come, or if it does, it won't for long appease a constantly growing ego. If you're out for glory you'll never have enough, and you'll never be happy. On the other hand, if you really care and want to help, then a lack of recognition is no great tragedy. To the contrary, it can be a very satisfying approach - you do things because they are valid in themselves, not because they are calculated to bring so many votes and so much glory. If meaning and significance have anything to do with happiness - and I think they do! - then the Silent Revolutionary is one of the happiest leaders around. Who's a martyr?
Silent Revolutions can give deep-feeling leaders a deeply satisfying leadership experience. You can buy glory and recognition: you can't buy meaning. Satisfaction has to come from inside. Newspaper headlines can't give it to you. The price of leading a Silent Revolution is high, but well worth paying. To pay it back with interest, try some real brotherly love. It can be the happiest thing that ever happens to you.

<CENTER>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/up.gif (http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/origin.html#top) </CENTER></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE><!--end center column--></TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap width=15 background=images/gutter_right.gif>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/gutter_right_corner.gif</TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap width=38>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/blank.gif</TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top width=150>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/blank.gif</TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap width=15 background=images/gutter_left.gif>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/gutter_leftbtm_corner.gif</TD><TD vAlign=top bgColor=#ffffff><TABLE height=15 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" background=images/bottom_table_shade.gif border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/blank.gif</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD><TD vAlign=bottom noWrap width=15 background=images/gutter_right.gif>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/gutter_rightbtm_corner.gif</TD><TD vAlign=top noWrap width=38>http://www.paradoxicalcommandments.com/images/blank.gif</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
<!-- footer -->© Copyright (javascript:displayWindow('/copyright.html',350,480)) 1968, 2005 Kent M. Keith. All Rights Reserved

<SCRIPT language=javascript><!--var me="jason";var to="@";var mad="paradoxicalcommandments.com"document.write("Your thoughts");--></SCRIPT>Your thoughts (jason@paradoxicalcommandments.com) about this site are welcomed.

anmota
02/28/2008, 10:41 PM
Sightings of the Paradoxical Commandments

The Paradoxical Commandments were written by Kent M. Keith and published in 1968 in his booklet for student leaders titled The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council. The Paradoxical Commandments immediately began circulating among student leaders and later the general public in the United States and overseas.

As the Paradoxical Commandments were shared, those who shared them occasionally changed a few words or changed the title and format. One version is known as the "Ten Commandments of Leadership." The version that Mother Teresa put up on the wall of her children's home in Calcutta was titled "Anyway" and consisted of eight of the original ten Paradoxical Commandments, reformatted as a poem. Another version of the Paradoxical Commandments often attributed to Mother Teresa, but noticeably different from the version on her wall, is "The Final Analysis."

Here is a short list of sightings:

Books, Speeches, Miscellaneous

In Mother Teresa: A Simple Path, compiled by Lucinda Vardey (1995), page 185. Eight of the original ten Paradoxical Commandments were reformatted as a poem titled "Anyway." Vardey reported that it was "a sign on the wall of Shishu Bhavan, the children's home in Calcutta."

In The 8th Habit, by Stephen R. Covey (2004), p. 80. Covey used the "Final Analysis" version of the Paradoxical Commandments, and attributed the commandments to Mother Teresa.

In Superman: The Never-Ending Battle (2004), author Roger Stern describes how Superman's father, Jonathan Kent, brought home a copy of the Paradoxical Commandments one day, and he and young Clark Kent framed them and put them up in the family library. 'Words to live by, Clark,' Jonathan had said, as he'd ticked off the ten simple rules for facing life's adversity. 'There will always be people who put you down, despite the good you do. Whenever that happens, just keep doing it anyway.' Roger Stern was kind enough to say in the Acknowledgments: "A special thanks to the inspiration of Kent M. Keith, who in 1968 at the ripe old age of nineteen first wrote the "Paradoxical Commandments." You can learn more about them at www.paradoxicalcommandments.com. (Tell 'em Superman sent you.)"

In Becoming a Person of Influence, by John C. Maxwell (1997), p. 107. Maxwell correctly footnoted the source of the Paradoxical Commandments as Kent M. Keith, The Silent Revolution: Dynamic Leadership in the Student Council (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard Student Agencies) 1968.

In Turning Hurts into Halos, by Rev. Robert H. Schuller (1999), pages 1-2. Rev. Schuller described how he saw "Anyway" [The Paradoxical Commandments] framed and hung in the front lobby when he visited Mother Teresa's orphanage as a member of the delegation that represented the United States at Mother Teresa's funeral.

In The Seven Secrets, by John Hagee (2004), page 82. Hagee included eight of the original ten Paradoxical Commandments. He challenged his readers to live by these "do-it-anyway" decisions, and never give up.

In Keeping Spiritual Balance as We Grow Older, by Molly Srode and Bernie Srode (2005), pp. 66-67. The Srodes included the Paradoxical Commandments in a chapter about understanding what the right to choose is all about.

In In Search of the Good: A Catholic Understanding of Moral Living, published by the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops (2004), p. 207. The Paradoxical Commandments are part of the chapter entitled "Free to be fully alive."

In The Leading Edge, Newsletter of the Leadership and Management Section, Medical Library Association, Volume 14, No.1 (December 2001).

In the Rotary District 5690 News, Volume 2, Issue 12 (June 2003). The district includes Rotary Clubs in parts of Kansas and Oklahoma.

In Buddha never raised kids & Jesus didn't drive carpool, by Vickie Falcone (2003), page 236. Falcone used "The Final Analysis" version of the Paradoxical Commandments, and cited them as "Mother Teresa's adaptation of the Paradoxical Commandments by Kent M. Keith." In fact, the version Falcone included in her book is not the version that was on Mother Teresa's wall.

In Stomping Out Fear, by Neil T. Anderson, Dave Park, and Rich Miller (2003), pages 103-104. Attributed to Kent M. Keith.

In I'd Rather Teach Peace by Coleman McCarthy (2003), pages 22-23. McCarthy presents eight of the Paradoxical Commandments, slightly modified, under the title "Anyway." McCarthy assumes that "Anyway" was written by Mother Teresa.

In Mind Like Water: Keeping Your Balance in a Chaotic World, by Jim Ballard (2002), pages 193-194. Attributed to Kent M. Keith.

In There's a Spiritual Solution to Every Problem, by Wayne W. Dyer (2001), pages 106-110. Dyer used "The Final Analysis" version of the Paradoxical Commandments, attributing them to Mother Teresa, and describing them as "An Eight-Point Plan of Decontamination." After learning of the authorship of the Paradoxical Commandments, Dyer revised his book so that new printings of his book attribute the Paradoxical Commandments to Kent M. Keith.

Set to music by Suzzy & Maggie Roche in their album, Zero Church (2001). The Roche sisters used "The Final Analysis" version of the Paradoxical Commandments. Their song is titled "Anyway."

In Chapter 7 of Pastor Wayne Cordeiro's book, Attitudes that Attract Success (2001).

In Chapter 7 of The Rhythm of Life by Matthew Kelly, pages 250-251 (2000). Kelly asked his readers to "travel in your mind to a small orphanage in Calcutta, and on a wall there you will find these words𢠈e used the "Anyway" version of the Paradoxical Commandments, formatted as a poem.

In Neil T. Anderson's book, Victory Over the Darkness, second edition (2000), pages 213-214. A footnote says "source and author unknown."

Translated into Japanese and used in homilies by a Japanese Catholic priest in Tokyo, Japan (2000).

In Perspective, a newsletter on prevention and education published by the East Carolina University Regional Training Center (Alcohol & Other Drugs) in December 1999/January 2000.

Used as a meditation/discussion piece at a gathering of high school student leaders before their annual state leadership workshop in Honolulu (1999).

In the October 28, 1999 edition of the newsletter of the Peninsula Sunrise Rotary Club of Hong Kong.

In the retirement speech of a member of the state legislature in South Carolina (1999).

In a paper presented in 1999 by Data Haji Mustapha Ma at the Pudu Rotary Club, District 3300, Malaysia, on "Rotary: Beyond 2000."

In an April 1998 report on the Suffolk County Special Olympics by Elissa Schott, who said that "these commandments along with hope and determination make up the essence of the Special Olympics."

Titled "Words to Think About" and attributed to Karl Menninger in the preface of the 1997 Annual Report of the KEY Project in Hawaii (Windward Oahu).

On the bulletin board in the teachers' lounge at Cate School in California (1997).

In the newsletter of the Gordon Institute of Tufts University, Fall 1996. The newsletter said: "The Paradoxical Commandments of Leadership,' written by an anonymous source, provide us with some perspective of human nature to consider as we embark on a new year in our program of Engineering Leadership."

In the 1995 Baccalaureate Address of Dr. E. LeBron Fairbanks, President of Mount Vernon Nazarene College.

In a handout of inspirational saying distributed to her graduate students by Dr. Fran Newman, a faculty member at the University of Southern California (1994).

In the Texas WIC News, published by the Texas Department of Health (1993).

In a handbook of poems and readings distributed at the Oklahoma Girls State program (1991).

In an Ann Landers column, attributed to E. T. Gurney, the Executive Director of the Canadian Hemophilia Society.


Websites

Included in the website for Women Today magazine
www.womentodaymagazine.com/career/paradox.html (http://www.womentodaymagazine.com/career/paradox.html)

Featured in the "Reader's Corner" of "The Family" website
www.thefamily.org/word/reflections/index2.php3?refid=195 (http://www.thefamily.org/word/reflections/index2.php3?refid=195)

On the website of the Miracles Circle of Pittsburgh.
www.miraclescircle.org/articles.htm (http://www.miraclescircle.org/articles.htm)

Listed in the Voice in the Wilderness Ministries website of James R. Davis
http://home.att.net/~jrd/paradox.html (http://home.att.net/~jrd/paradox.html)

Included in the website of the National Federation of the Blind of California as part of a report on a seminar
www.nfbcal.org/nfbc/journalss2004/ncal.html (http://www.nfbcal.org/nfbc/journalss2004/ncal.html)

Featured on "beliefnet," an international spiritual website
www.beliefnet.com/story/41/story_4119.html (http://www.beliefnet.com/story/41/story_4119.html)

Included as the "Ten Commandments of Leadership" in a website for Boy Scouts in Canada. The sighting is an excerpt from a speech given by Eddie Snow in which he attributed the Paradoxical Commandments to St. Edward wrestling coach Howard Ferguson.
www.scoutscan.com/scoutbits/morethots.html (http://www.scoutscan.com/scoutbits/morethots.html)

On a church website that described them as "Ten true paradoxes of true Godly leadership. A must read for leaders in the church."
cyber-church.com/thinkabout/paradoxicalcommandments.htm (http://cyber-church.com/thinkabout/paradoxicalcommandments.htm)

Listed under "inspiration" on the Empowering Caregivers website
www.care-givers.com/pages/inspiration/doitanyway.html (http://www.care-givers.com/pages/inspiration/doitanyway.html)

Included in the Community of Christ website
www.communityofchrist.net/Potpourri/10_Paradoxical_Commandments/ (http://www.communityofchrist.net/Potpourri/10_Paradoxical_Commandments/10_paradoxical_commandments.html)

PDK
02/29/2008, 06:31 AM
http://www.enotalone.com/amazon/img/x/0425195430.jpg (http://www.enotalone.com/books/0425195430.html)http://www.enotalone.com/article/4991.html

==================================
-- Hãy tìm một chữ Việt thích hợp để dịch chữ Anyway trong...'ngữ cảnh" này...
Trong trang nghiathuc.com VTV dịch là " Mặc!..."...
Có lẽ còn có chữ nào khác hơn chăng?

“There are three answers to every question: Yours, mine, and the right one.”
AMT


Chữ ni mòa dịch cho thiệt đúng ... Nẫu :D :D. Hi hi. thì phải dịch lòa ... Mược !

Ai cười cũng kệ ... Ai cười ... Mược


Đúng quá nghen :D :D. Ha ha.



:D :D :D